Inside the Collection

Gulgong Pioneers Museum Blog

June 27, 2012

Kate Chidlow
I was contacted late last year by Marie Gorie from the Gulgong Pioneers Museum about a project she was about to undertake. She wanted to re-order the textile store. Maintaining a collection store takes a lot of time and resources and obviously, as the collection grew, some of the maintenance had slipped.

String quartet by Kitty Smith – varnished with Dragons Blood

June 25, 2012

Lynne McNairn
This splendid string quartet (two violins, a viola and a cello) was made by Kitty Smith (1912-2005) a professional violin maker who started her craft in the 1930s. Kitty was the daughter of Arthur Edward (A E) Smith (1880-1978) who is considered the most important violin maker in Australia.

Refugee Week, Seeking refuge in hope

June 22, 2012

Melanie Pitkin
During the course of developing the Faith, fashion, fusion: Muslim women's style in Australia exhibition, we met Asme Fahmi. Asme, 31, is a Community Engagement Project Coordinator with the Community Relations Commission, a third year Shariah Law student at Daar Aisha Shariah College and a student of Islamic Studies at Charles Sturt University.

Refugee Week, Visiting Villawood Detention Centre

June 20, 2012

Melanie Pitkin
This is the second post we are privileged to share with you by guest writer, Widyan Al-Ubudy, for National Refugee Week. In this post, Widyan recounts her personal experiences as a volunteer at Sydney's Villawood Detention Centre and the deep and moving impact it has had on her.

Refugee Week, ‘No more running a mother and daughter story’

June 18, 2012

Melanie Pitkin
To recognise National Refugee Week, we invited Widyan Al-Ubudy, an up-and-coming journalist and media personality to write a post for the Museum about her personal experiences with refugees. Widyan, 20, originally from Iraq, was born in a refugee camp in Saudi Arabia after her family escaped Saddam Hussein's regime in the early 1990s.

Cleopatra’s Needle or ‘Thornton’s Scent Bottle’

June 13, 2012

Geoff Barker
This photograph was taken from George Street, Sydney and looks up Bathurst Street. At the very end, where it joins Elizabeth Street and Hyde Park, the single most obvious feature of the photograph can still be seen today.

The conservation of a transistor radio

June 11, 2012

Kate Chidlow
A transistor radio, designed as an ‘oriental’ flower basket by Toshiba in 1957 for the western market, recently came to the conservation lab for treatment. It is made of cream and red plastic with a chrome handle and it has a radio and speaker inside.

Photographing the 1874 Transit of Venus

June 6, 2012

Geoff Barker
The Transit of Venus on 6 June 2012 is the latest occurrence of an event that has shaped the scientific history of Australia. Captain Cook’s expedition to observe the 1769 transit in Tahiti led to the European settlement of Australia.

The Ukulele Craze

June 4, 2012

Lynne McNairn
Recently ukuleles have been undergoing quite a revival with ukulele clubs and festivals springing up all over the world (there are at least seven clubs in Sydney). But Hawaiian music and ukuleles were very popular in Australia during the 1920s and 1930s and remained so until the 1950s.