Category: Death in the Museum

Tram hearse

January 7, 2013

With the NSW Government getting close to returning more trams (light rail) to Sydney I thought I would share with you probably the weirdest tram produced. While most trams were designed to carry the general public, some special-purpose ones were made to carry prisoners to and from gaol, stretchers on hospital trams during the

Meet the curator- Rebecca Bower

April 14, 2011

Name: Rebecca Bower What is your specialty area? Like many curators at the Powerhouse I studied archaeology, having wanted to be an Egyptologist since I was a little girl. It was pure coincidence that my first year at university was soon after Raiders of the Lost Ark came out.

Pushing up daisies- a mortuary table

October 18, 2010

This mortuary table was used in the mortuary at St Joseph's Hospital, Auburn, in Sydney’s western suburbs in the 1940s and 1950s. It was used for both teaching and medical purposes. It was also used to prepare bodies for transport to funeral homes.

Death in the museum- part 3: Ancient Egypt

April 5, 2010

I'm starting to notice a bit of a theme amongst some of the entries for our 1st birthday competition - stories about mysterious sightings in the Museum, ghosts and other morbid tales! So, perhaps it's a good time to raise some objects from the dead again in part 3 to our 'Death in the Museum' series!

Death in the Museum part 3: ashes to ashes

March 3, 2010

Part 3 in a series (click here for part one, and part two) I have been pretty inspired by recent research done by Einar Docker on Annette Kellerman here at the Museum and I was amazed to find that we have this casket in our collection.

Happy Friday the 13th!

November 13, 2009

Unlucky Friday the 13th is apparently the most popular superstition in the world. I, for one, do not have supersititious beliefs, I open umbrellas inside, I like black cats, and I confidently walk under ladders.

Death in the Museum- part two- the crematorium

October 23, 2009

In the first contribution to Death in the Museum, Erika wrote: ‘coffins have traditionally been made to protect the body, and thus been made out of strong materials such as steel and hardwood’. It is interesting that this practice survives because most coffins are burned, not buried.

Death in the Museum- part one- green burials

September 15, 2009

I am in the middle of acquiring a coffin, and not just any coffin, one that is environmentally friendly. This LifeArt coffin is not only spectacular looking, it is also made from almost 100% recycled materials, and will break down easily once in the ground.