Inside the Collection

Category: Science

Meet the Curator: Nina Earl

October 17, 2018

Nina Earl
Name: Nina Earl Role: Assistant Curator What is your area of expertise? All things science but currently I am reading and learning about 3D printing. The exciting part is that I get to visit research laboratories and see what is happening in the speculative research of this area.

Industrial Revolution in Australia – impact on manufacturing in the 1800s

August 29, 2018

Margaret Simpson
When we think of the Industrial Revolution in Britain with its steam engines powering machines, the mass production of goods, thousands of poor farming families leaving the countryside to work in 'satanic' mills and factories and the rise of the wealthy middle class, it's hard to see how this could be applied to Australia.

Shifting the balance

August 15, 2018

Tilly Boleyn
The Museum has so many wonderful toys in the collection. Looking through the collection online is a journey filled with memories, delightful surprises and the occasional stuff of nightmares. Toys send strong messages to kids about what they should be interested in and what they can aspire to.

A Curator in Antarctica

July 4, 2018

Nina Earl
Summer in Antarctica is smelly, noisy and cold. The temperature hovers around 0°C and on most of the rocky sites there is an overwhelming smell of digested krill or diesel. You may wonder why on earth someone would want to visit.

This Little Radio

June 19, 2018

Karolina Novak
A small showcase on Level 1 at the Museum shares the story of a very special little radio. Earlier this year, Red Room Company invited MAAS to contribute an object from the museum collection to the learning resource and workshop program of Poetry Object 2018.

Analogue vs. Digital

April 18, 2018

Nina Earl
Today our computers operate in binary (1s and 0s) but this has not always been the case. For many years analogue computers where more effective than their digital counterparts, and were widely used in scientific and industrial applications where digital computers of the time lacked sufficient performance.

Cuberider: Australia’s first payload to the ISS

February 7, 2018

Sarah Reeves
Almost exactly a year ago, the Museum was approached by Sydney start-up Cuberider with an unusual offer. In December 2016 Cuberider had launched Australia’s first ever payload to the International Space Station (ISS) – a Raspberry Pi computer used to run science experiments designed by high school students around the country.

Image of the 1906 total lunar eclipse

January 31, 2018

Sarah Reeves
On Wednesday 31 January, 2018, Australia and New Zealand will experience a total lunar eclipse. This occurs when the moon moves completely into the Earth’s shadow, blocking out the Sun’s light, and plunging the moon into darkness.

Experimentations Upgrade

December 13, 2017

Sarah Reeves
The Experimentations exhibition opened in 1988 and has proved popular with our younger visitors ever since. Aimed at children aged 5-12 years, their parents, teachers and carers, the exhibition is designed to be an informal learning space that inspires curiosity and questioning, and allows visitors to play and experiment with materials and processes.

Bromley’s model of the Antikythera Mechanism

November 1, 2017

Lauren Poole
In early 1900, a sponge diver diving off the coast of Antikythera – a small Greek island between Crete and the Peloponnese – discovered the remains of an ancient, wrecked cargo ship. Dated to between 200 and 100 BCE, amongst the ship’s surviving contents of bronze and marble sculptures was a curious piece of rock with an embedded gear wheel.