Inside the Collection

Category: Science

Analogue vs. Digital

April 18, 2018

Nina Earl
Today our computers operate in binary (1s and 0s) but this has not always been the case. For many years analogue computers where more effective than their digital counterparts, and were widely used in scientific and industrial applications where digital computers of the time lacked sufficient performance.

Cuberider: Australia’s first payload to the ISS

February 7, 2018

Sarah Reeves
Almost exactly a year ago, the Museum was approached by Sydney start-up Cuberider with an unusual offer. In December 2016 Cuberider had launched Australia’s first ever payload to the International Space Station (ISS) – a Raspberry Pi computer used to run science experiments designed by high school students around the country.

Image of the 1906 total lunar eclipse

January 31, 2018

Sarah Reeves
On Wednesday 31 January, 2018, Australia and New Zealand will experience a total lunar eclipse. This occurs when the moon moves completely into the Earth’s shadow, blocking out the Sun’s light, and plunging the moon into darkness.

Experimentations Upgrade

December 13, 2017

Sarah Reeves
The Experimentations exhibition opened in 1988 and has proved popular with our younger visitors ever since. Aimed at children aged 5-12 years, their parents, teachers and carers, the exhibition is designed to be an informal learning space that inspires curiosity and questioning, and allows visitors to play and experiment with materials and processes.

Bromley’s model of the Antikythera Mechanism

November 1, 2017

Lauren Poole
In early 1900, a sponge diver diving off the coast of Antikythera – a small Greek island between Crete and the Peloponnese – discovered the remains of an ancient, wrecked cargo ship. Dated to between 200 and 100 BCE, amongst the ship’s surviving contents of bronze and marble sculptures was a curious piece of rock with an embedded gear wheel.

More than Just Digital: Before the Computer

October 25, 2017

Nina Earl
Imagine life before smart phones, maybe you remember? What about before computers? Our computer technology looks a lot different today than it did in the past. It’s smaller, lighter, more powerful and a whole lot faster.

3D Printing and the Open Source Movement

September 26, 2017

Nina Earl
If you have been to a maker fair or school in the last few years, then you may have seen 3D printers in action. But when did this manufacturing technology first emerge and why was there so much hype? 3D printing is a form of additive manufacturing, where the object is created by laying down successive layers of building material until the desired form is reached.

Nightingales, Sirens, Ventriloquists and Gramophones: This is a Voice

September 6, 2017

Katie Dyer
Plutarch (b. 46 CE) tells the story of a man who plucks the feathers from a Nightingale and on finding nothing more than a scrawny body not worth eating, exclaims ‘You are a voice and nothing more.’ The power and potency of the voice, in this case, the human voice, is the focus of the exhibition This is a Voice which opened at the Powerhouse Museum on August 10.

Historical Solar Eclipse Images

August 22, 2017

Sarah Reeves
While we wait eagerly to hear whether our colleagues from Sydney Observatory managed to catch a glimpse of yesterday’s total solar eclipse in the US – and quietly seethe with jealousy that we couldn’t be there ourselves (or is that just me?) – it seemed like the perfect opportunity to dig these amazing photographs out of our collection.

National Science Week: Scientific Icons

August 17, 2017

Sarah Reeves
It’s National Science Week! Tune in each day to meet MAAS’ science curators, discover objects from our wonderful science collection and find out what a science curator actually does in a day. Australia is no stranger to great inventions: from WiFi to Ultrasound scanners, solar cell technology to pacemakers, Australian scientists have been responsible for countless scientific advances that have changed the world for the better.