Inside the Collection

Tag: Archaeology

Bromley’s model of the Antikythera Mechanism

November 1, 2017

In early 1900, a sponge diver diving off the coast of Antikythera – a small Greek island between Crete and the Peloponnese – discovered the remains of an ancient, wrecked cargo ship. Dated to between 200 and 100 BCE, amongst the ship’s surviving contents of bronze and marble sculptures was a curious piece of rock with an embedded gear wheel.

Sydney’s most famous shipwreck – the ‘Dunbar’

August 21, 2017

On 20 August 2017 it was the 160th anniversary of New South Wales' worst maritime disaster, the sinking of the 'Dunbar'. On a pitch-dark rainy night with a gale blowing a total of 121 passengers and crew of the sailing ship, 'Dunbar', lost their lives not long after midnight.

The Goods Line – then and now

September 3, 2015

Yesterday I took a stroll along Sydney's newest pedestrian walkway, The Goods Line. It opened last Sunday (30 August 2015) and goes from the Ultimo Road railway bridge to the Museum's new entrance in Macarthur Street, Ultimo, an inner Sydney suburb.

National Archaeology Week

May 21, 2015

It was both poignant and fitting that National Archaeology Week coincides with the dreadful news that Palmyra (Tadmor) in Syria - the ancient oasis city of the desert that nearly two thousand years ago was the western fulcrum of the Silk Road - is under threat of destruction.

The Marchinbar find – Medieval travels to Australia from Africa?

July 9, 2014

In 1944 when Morry Isenberg discovered nine coins lying in the sand on the island of Marchinbar in the Northern Territory, little would he have imagined they would lead to explosive claims about Australia’s early global connections and, nearly 70 years after this chance encounter, provide the motivation for an international expedition.

Archaeology Week – the Powerhouse Museum in Greece

May 25, 2013

Archaeology and the Powerhouse Museum go back a long way. The most obvious examples are exhibitions focussing on archaeological material including '1000 Years of the Olympic Games', 'The Great Wall of China', and the recent, 'Spirit of Jang-in' from Korea.

Archaeology Week- ‘Pompeii of the north’ in Powerhouse’s Guildhall Collection

May 20, 2013

There is currently great excitement in London as evidence of Roman lives - wonderfully preserved in the London mud - are being extracted by archaeologists. Among the material are hundreds of Roman shoes, jewellery, waxed wooden writing tablets with their writing styli, jewellery, cosmetic tools, part of the Temple of Mithras and of course, pottery galore.

Olympic efforts – ancient Greek athletes

August 8, 2012

In addition to being beautiful, decorated ancient Greek pots are ‘windows to the past'. Their painted designs could vary from everyday scenes of people at work and play, to gods and heroes playing out the myths that provided lessons on how to conduct a righteous life .

4000 years of mistakes

January 10, 2012

Recently we were doing the final proofs for a new book about the issues of long term preservation of digital information. I came across a discrepancy in two separate entries on the same object that introduced its own issue about information preservation.

My escape from Cairo: Egypt’s Uprising and the National Museum

February 9, 2011

I have just returned from Cairo after a tumultuous few days caught up in the demonstrations in Egypt. I was meant to be there for 6 weeks undertaking research for my PhD before leading an independent 24-day tour of Egypt, “From Alexandria to Abu Simbel” for Alumni Travel in Sydney.