Inside the Collection

Tag: Maurice Guillaux

The Story of Australia’s First Airmail-Part 11

October 29, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
After thrilling Australian audiences with his airshows and making history by flying the first airmail, in September 1914 Maurice Guillaux realised one of the plans he had made earlier in the year by establishing a flying school at Ham Common, which is now the site of Richmond RAAF Base, to the west of Sydney.

The Story of Australia’s First Airmail-Part 10

September 29, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
As Maurice Guillaux recovered from the August 1 crash of his aircraft (see Part 9 of this story), war broke out in Europe, plunging that continent into the conflict that would become known as The Great War.

The Story of Australia’s First Airmail-Part 7

July 17, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
After being forced by a strong headwind to turn back to the town of Harden late in the afternoon of July 16, 1914, Maurice Guillaux spent the night in the town, staying at the Carrington Hotel, which still survives today.

The Story of Australia’s First Airmail-part 3

May 8, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
Not content with dazzling crowds in Sydney and Newcastle with his aerial acrobatics, on May 8, 1914, French stunt pilot Maurice Guillaux also made the first seaplane flight in Australia, test flying a Farman “hydro-aeroplane” imported into the country by Lebbeus Hordern (1891-1928), a member of the wealthy and influential Sydney merchant family.

The Story of Australia’s First Airmail-part 2

April 20, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
Flying in Cloudland! Looping the Loop! The World’s Most Daring Aviator! Aviation Extraordinary! Not long after his arrival in Sydney on April 8, Maurice Guillaux began to make headlines, as his promoters and newspaper reporters searched for superlatives to express the excitement of Guillaux’ aerial performances.

The Story of Australia’s first Airmail-part 1

April 8, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
Soaring above the Transport exhibition is one of the Powerhouse Museum’s treasures, a tiny Blériot XI monoplane. With fewer than 30 aircraft made before World War 1 still preserved around the world, this aircraft would be significant for its rarity alone.