Inside the Collection

Tag: scientific instruments

How to build a time machine

September 5, 2018

Sarah Reeves
Back in January, the Catalyst team from the ABC approached us about using some of the Museum's clocks in an upcoming episode of their show. They were producing an episode entitled ‘How To Build A Time Machine', which would delve into the nature of time, whether time travel could ever become a reality, and what rules you'd want to follow if you did indeed find yourself in possession of a working time machine.

A Curator in Antarctica

July 4, 2018

Nina Earl
Summer in Antarctica is smelly, noisy and cold. The temperature hovers around 0°C and on most of the rocky sites there is an overwhelming smell of digested krill or diesel. You may wonder why on earth someone would want to visit.

Analogue vs. Digital

April 18, 2018

Nina Earl
Today our computers operate in binary (1s and 0s) but this has not always been the case. For many years analogue computers where more effective than their digital counterparts, and were widely used in scientific and industrial applications where digital computers of the time lacked sufficient performance.

Cuberider: Australia’s first payload to the ISS

February 7, 2018

Sarah Reeves
Almost exactly a year ago, the Museum was approached by Sydney start-up Cuberider with an unusual offer. In December 2016 Cuberider had launched Australia’s first ever payload to the International Space Station (ISS) – a Raspberry Pi computer used to run science experiments designed by high school students around the country.

Image of the 1906 total lunar eclipse

January 31, 2018

Sarah Reeves
On Wednesday 31 January, 2018, Australia and New Zealand will experience a total lunar eclipse. This occurs when the moon moves completely into the Earth’s shadow, blocking out the Sun’s light, and plunging the moon into darkness.

Bromley’s model of the Antikythera Mechanism

November 1, 2017

Lauren Poole
In early 1900, a sponge diver diving off the coast of Antikythera – a small Greek island between Crete and the Peloponnese – discovered the remains of an ancient, wrecked cargo ship. Dated to between 200 and 100 BCE, amongst the ship’s surviving contents of bronze and marble sculptures was a curious piece of rock with an embedded gear wheel.

More than Just Digital: Before the Computer

October 25, 2017

Nina Earl
Imagine life before smart phones, maybe you remember? What about before computers? Our computer technology looks a lot different today than it did in the past. It’s smaller, lighter, more powerful and a whole lot faster.

Inspiration, Expiration and Methods of Release

September 21, 2017

Kathy Hackett
This elegantly choreographed image from the studio of Kerry & Co. shows young women from the Bronte Surf Life Saving Brigade modelling three methods of ‘release’ used in lifesaving c. 1908.

Nightingales, Sirens, Ventriloquists and Gramophones: This is a Voice

September 6, 2017

Katie Dyer
Plutarch (b. 46 CE) tells the story of a man who plucks the feathers from a Nightingale and on finding nothing more than a scrawny body not worth eating, exclaims ‘You are a voice and nothing more.’ The power and potency of the voice, in this case, the human voice, is the focus of the exhibition This is a Voice which opened at the Powerhouse Museum on August 10.

Historical Solar Eclipse Images

August 22, 2017

Sarah Reeves
While we wait eagerly to hear whether our colleagues from Sydney Observatory managed to catch a glimpse of yesterday’s total solar eclipse in the US – and quietly seethe with jealousy that we couldn’t be there ourselves (or is that just me?) – it seemed like the perfect opportunity to dig these amazing photographs out of our collection.