Inside the Collection

Tag: Sydney

A Perfect Silicon Sphere

July 12, 2017

Sarah Reeves
Since 1889 the kilogram has been defined by a small metal cylinder stored in a vault in France. But now, with the help of a perfect silicon sphere recently acquired by the Museum, that’s all about to change.

Microgravity – A small exhibition

July 5, 2017

Andrew Jacob
In late 2016 the exhibition Gravity (and Wonder) explored the human fascination with gravity, space and time through scientific investigations and artistic explorations. In a partnership between Penrith Regional Gallery & The Lewers Bequest and the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences curators Dr Lee-Anne Hall and Katie Dyer developed a three month program of events & workshops to support the exhibition.

A Sydney Icon: Fashion at Luna Park

October 5, 2016

Anne-Marie Van de Ven
  Whenever asked ‘when, where and what’ to visit in Sydney, we know the answer: the Opera House with her pure white sails lit in moonlight and of course, our iconic Sydney Harbour Bridge that sparkles beautifully every New Year’s Eve.

Guy Buckingham and Australian Motor Racing

December 1, 2015

Margaret Simpson
Last month saw the passing of Guy Buckingham (1921-2015), the man who introduced low-cost motor sport into Australia with the Formula Vee. This was an inexpensive open-wheeled racing car for beginners using a VW engine, suspension and transmission, devised in 1959.

George Gittoes collection

November 10, 2015

Anne-Marie Van de Ven
This evening, George Gittoes receives the 2015 Sydney Peace Prize award and presents the annual Sydney Peace Prize lecture in the Sydney Town Hall. This is the first time this Prize, Australia’s only international prize for peace, will be awarded to an artist.

Happy Birthday to our Sydney Opera House

October 20, 2015

Paul Donnelly
On this day in 1973, Queen Elizabeth II officially opened the Sydney Opera House. The ABC beamed the occasion by satellite to an appreciative world. Closer to home there were sighs of relief from the politicians, architects and engineers who had, to that time, weathered one controversy after another.

Vale Peter Rushforth, a great Australian ceramicist

August 4, 2015

Anne-Marie Van de Ven
Peter Rushforth was one of Australia’s great ceramicists. Along with a number of his contemporaries, including his early mentor Allan Lowe, Rushforth shared an abiding interest in Asian, especially Chinese and Japanese ceramic aesthetics, philosophies and traditions.

Shirley Martin: Australian industrial designer

July 29, 2015

Anne-Marie Van de Ven
Shirley Martin was a female industrial designer based in Sydney who had a long and illustrious career as a post-WWII Australian textile and ceramic designer. She is best known for designing the 1956 Melbourne Olympic Games towel, but there is much more to her remarkable design industry success story.

The Aesthetics of Prosthetics: a Brief History

July 15, 2015

Damian McDonald
On Wednesday, 15 July 2015, museums around the world are sharing #DisabilityStories found in their collections. We're joining the conversation with this post by MAAS Curator, Damian McDonald, who details the technologies used in prosthetics in our collection: The use of prosthetics dates back to at least 300 BCE, the date of a Roman bronze leg that was excavated from a grave in Capua, Italy.

Wirth’s Circus hits the road

April 8, 2015

Peter Cox
The Circus Factory exhibition includes costumes, photographs and documents from the Museum's Wirth's Circus collection. The Wirth name has a special place in Australian circus folklore. Billed as Australia's own 'Greatest Show on Earth', Wirth's Circus toured from 1880 until its demise in 1963.

The need for speed: saving the Speedo collection

February 9, 2015

Glynis Jones
Once proudly known as the great Aussie cossie, Speedo swimwear occupies an important place in Australia’s sporting and manufacturing heritage. From the company’s beginnings in the 1920s, its aim was to excel in the manufacture of competitive swimwear.

The Queen’s 1954 Royal Tour of Australia – a rare surviving memento

January 14, 2015

Margaret Simpson
Many of the objects which come into the Museum have great stories. One of the most delightful over the last few months was the acquisition of this very rare fabric-covered railway timetable. It was used in the Museum's superb 1901 Governor-General's railway carriage in which Queen Elizabeth II travelled to parts of New South Wales during her 1954 Royal Tour of Australia.