Inside the Collection

Tag: toys

The Story of Australia’s First Airmail-Part 9

August 6, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
Despite the rigours of the first airmail flight from Melbourne to Sydney over July 16-18 (as recounted in parts 6-8 of this story), Maurice Guillaux was not one to rest on his laurels. Within days he was in the air again, making several flights with Lebbeus Hordern’s Farman Hydro-aeroplane (see part 3 of this story), including one on July 22 when he carried two passengers, Hordern and Lt.

The Story of Australia’s First Airmail-Part 8

July 18, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
After being delayed at Harden on July 17, due to poor weather conditions for flying, Maurice Guillaux was determined to continue the first airmail flight the following day. While conditions had improved, they were still far from ideal, but on July 18 Guillaux took off at 7.15am and battled a strong headwind and freezing temperatures to reach Goulburn, 150km away, exactly two hours later.

Mechanisation of agriculture – 1889 Fowler steam ploughing engine

June 23, 2014

Margaret Simpson
One of the most visually impressive objects in the Museum's collection is this fabulous steam ploughing engine. It's an example of the world's first successful method of powered cultivation, developed by John Fowler of Leeds, England, in 1863 and was part of the mechanisation and industrialisation of agriculture during the nineteenth century.

The Story of Australia’s First Airmail-part 3

May 8, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
Not content with dazzling crowds in Sydney and Newcastle with his aerial acrobatics, on May 8, 1914, French stunt pilot Maurice Guillaux also made the first seaplane flight in Australia, test flying a Farman “hydro-aeroplane” imported into the country by Lebbeus Hordern (1891-1928), a member of the wealthy and influential Sydney merchant family.

The Story of Australia’s first Airmail-part 1

April 8, 2014

Kerrie Dougherty
Soaring above the Transport exhibition is one of the Powerhouse Museum’s treasures, a tiny Blériot XI monoplane. With fewer than 30 aircraft made before World War 1 still preserved around the world, this aircraft would be significant for its rarity alone.

This week, in Game Masters, Part II…

March 5, 2014

Deborah Turnbull
As promised, the newly acquired Magnavox Odyssey gaming console went on exhibit in the Game Masters exhibition mid-February. If you’re looking for it, it’s just before ‘Arcade Heroes’ in the alcove of Game Masters; just across from the double click showcase housing similarly exciting game consoles from the Powerhouse Museum Collection.

Goodbye Shirley Temple

February 12, 2014

Margaret Simpson
The popular and timeless child film star, Shirley Temple, has just died at the age of 85. This child's colouring book is one of the many items of merchandising produced when she was in her prime. For adult and child fans alike, it provided a fascinating sneak peek into Shirley's glamorous world showing where she worked at the film studio in Hollywood, her home, pet dogs, rabbits and horse, her own pedal car as well as the car her father drove her to work in.

Hill’s Mini-Hoist rotary clothes line

January 6, 2014

Margaret Simpson
I've seen this little 60-cm high Hill's Hoist clothes line in our basement storage area for years and always assumed it was a model which reps might have taken around to secure sales. Clearly, lugging a full-size clothes line around with you was out of the question and this is a perfect model of the famous clothes line which sprouted up in backyards across the nation.

Fifty Years in the TARDIS: the golden anniversary of Doctor Who

November 23, 2013

Kerrie Dougherty
The weekend of November 23/24, 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the first screening of the iconic British science fiction television series Doctor Who First screened in the UK on November 23, 1963, the adventures of the nameless wandering time traveller and his British police-box-shaped time machine, the TARDIS (Time and Relative Dimension in Space, if you’ve always wondered what that acronym meant), have been shown in countries around the world and become firmly embedded in global popular culture.

Taronga Park Zoo monkey bike

November 20, 2013

Margaret Simpson
Do you remember the monkeys riding tiny bicycles at Sydney's Taronga Park Zoo? This miniature tandem bicycle was made for the Zoo's monkey circus and used between 1936 and 1940. It's one of the most unusual bicycles produced by the Sydney firm, Edworthy Cycle & Motor Works.

These petrol pumps are history, but what’s the future?

November 6, 2013

Debbie Rudder
  Young Sydney engineer Frank Hammond invented the 'visible volumetric' petrol pump around 1920 and licensed his patent rights to manufacturers in Australia and the UK. Garages purchased visible pumps to ensure that they were supplying an accurately measured volume of petrol, or ‘motor spirit’, to each customer.